Aircraft servicing
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From the day you took your first flight, you were very likely introduced to aircraft servicing - the stuff you do like filling the fuel tanks, cleaning the windshields, adding a quart of oil, inflating the tires, de-icing, or popping a ¼ turn dzus fastener back in, etc. All important to a safe flight, but none of it is maintenance that requires a logbook entry. After all, do you make a logbook entry after each fill up with 100LL? Of course not.

Servicing is the most basic form of maintenance and falls one step below preventive maintenance. You have likely done all those tasks and most assuredly line crew folks certainly have. Never a page has been inked in a logbook after any of that stuff was performed. To my knowledge, anyways, and I have looked at many an aircraft maintenance logbook in my 35 years as an A&P.

FAR 43, appendix A, paragraph c outlines 31 items that an owner or operator can perform, and they are known as preventive maintenance items. Those, incidentally, require a logbook entry. None of the aforementioned tasks qualify as preventive maintenance; that is why I refer to them as aircraft service items.

Every once in a blue moon the PIC receives a question about the legality of inflating a tire with air. No worries, you are only servicing your aircraft to ensure a safe flight. Fill n go fly!

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Daddis At AOPA: 
 

Every once in a blue moon the PIC receives a question about the legality of inflating a tire with air. No worries, you are only servicing your aircraft to ensure a safe flight. Fill n go fly!

Well, maybe.  This is a can of worms someone opened 12 years ago, and was elevated to and addressed by the FAA Chief Counsel.  Of course, if it's your own noncommercial Part 91 plane, you can perform “preventive maintenance” yourself, but if the FAA says checking the tire pressure is “preventive maintenance” on your particular aircraft type (as they have for the Lear 60), you'd have to log each check of tire pressure (and, by extension, each addition of air to the tire).

Part of the problem, I think, is the fact that there's nothing in the regulations defining “servicing”.  Of course, Part 23 requires a section of the POH covering “servicing”, which explicitly specifically separates “servicing” from “maintenance”.

Servicing information that covers details regarding servicing points, capacities of tanks, reservoirs, types of fluids to be used, pressures applicable to the various systems, location of access panels for inspection and servicing, locations of lubrication points, lubricants to be used, equipment required for servicing, tow instructions and limitations, mooring, jacking, and leveling information.

And frankly, given this, I'm not sure how the Chief Counsel came to its conclusion in the legal interpretation that checking tire pressures on any aircraft isn't “servicing” as opposed to “preventive maintenance”, since only  “[r]emoval, installation, and repair of landing gear tires” are considered “preventive maintenance”, and inflating or checking pressures aren't [r]emoval, installation, and repair".

Personally, I'd think anything which is listed in the “Servicing” section of your POH is not “maintenance”, preventive or otherwise, and need not be logged, no less performed only by an authorized maintainer.  And the Chief Counsel clearly stated interpretation of this issue was a “case by case” situation, not a general statement.  Further, FAA hasn't put out a list of “servicing” items which are considered “maintenance”, so unless the FSDO sees you airing your tires and gets upset about it, it's pretty much a non-issue.

But just sayin'…