Basic Medical
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I am from Germany and living here in Florida since 2019 actually as a permanent resident. I have the PPL (Flight Crew License according to ICAO) for airplanes, motor-powered gliders and gliders. Additionally, I am a flight instructor for gliders for 30 years. My last Class 2 medical was issued in Germany in 2017. 

I want to start flying again in the USA. Is it possible under these conditions to apply for a Basic Medical or do i have to apply for a medical for Private Pilots?

Thank you for your feedback

Michael

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1516 Posts

@Michael Meile
Unless that “Class 2 medical issued in Germany in 2017” was an FAA medical, it's not possible as stated.  Basic Med is available only to those who previously held an FAA medical certificate.  You'd also need a US driver's license (which you didn't say you had, but which if you're a permanent resident in the US you might actually have).  There are no provisions for use of a foreign DL or medical.  From 14 CFR 61.23:

(3) A person using a U.S. driver's license to meet the requirements of paragraph (c) while operating under the conditions and limitations of § 61.113(i) must meet the following requirements -

(i) The person must -

(A) Comply with all medical requirements or restrictions associated with his or her U.S. driver's license;

(B) At any point after July 14, 2006, have held a medical certificate issued under part 67 of this chapter;

Votes

@Ronald Levy
Hi Ronald, yes, I have the driver's license. I forgot to add the information. BTW coincidently I found out that my US License issued in 1981 by the FAA still is in the database of the FAA. So, I think I can use this License in combination with my German Licenses for reactivation. Is that correct?

Thank you 

Michael 

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1516 Posts

I'm still not clear about the medical you got in 2017 – US or German?  Unless it was US, you can't go the Basic Med route now without first getting a US medical.  Also, was the FAA pilot certificate earned by the full written/practical test process in the USA or issued on the basis of your German pilot certificate?  If it was issued on the basis of your German license, you could fly with it based on a current German medical certificate.  If it was earned in the US, you can't avoid getting an FAA medical certificate.

In any case, you'll have to get an FAA flight review (see 61.56 for details) before you act as PIC here on the basis of your FAA pilot certificate (however you got it).  

The other thing you'll have to do regardless of all else is obtain a new plastic pilot certificate from the FAA to replace the paper one you got 40 years ago.  The FAA stopped allowing the use of the paper certificates 12 years ago and now requires the newer plastic cards.  Here's how to get one:

Airmen Certification | Federal Aviation Administration (faa.gov)

 

Votes

@Ronald Levy
His U.S. certificate is based on his German pilot license, according to the FAA database (publicly available on www.faa.gov).  Most of the countries in the world (other than the U.S.) issue pilot licenses, not pilot certificates.  The licenses typically have an expiration date and must be renewed.  If I remember correctly, Germany was one of the countries that placed an endorsement on the license for the medical certification.  If this is still the case, then you would need to get the German medical exam and perform any actions necessary to renew the German pilot license.  (It likely expired without the medical examination having been reenwed.)

Also, the European Union came into being in November 1993.  Since EASA is the European Union Aviation Safety Agency, I would think that it was established on or after November 1993.  I don't know if any pilot licensing numbering systems were changed.

The easiest way to figure things out (unless you have kept up with them over the years), would be to have the FAA validate you foreign license.  This would have to be done in order for them to reissue you a new certificate, anyway.  The procedure can be found at 

 

Also, while you may have an instructor credential for Germany, the U.S. pilot database does not show that you have a U.S. Flight Instructor certificate.  You would need to get a U.S. Commercial certificate in order to get the U.S. instructor certificate.

 

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@Ronald Levy
Sorry if I am not precise enough. 

With the Basic Medical i am clear. I understood that it's not possible for me.

My medical Class 2 was issued in Germany - European Union - and my license is a FCL ICAO license issued also in Germany - European Union. The license is not expiring but every two years it needs a test flight with an examiner. To keep the license active additionally a valid medical is necessary. So probably in FAA terminology it is a certificate (?)

My situation now is that I have the German license but no valid medical and no valid test flight. But i have the FAA license based on the German one. I never applied for a FAA medical I only had German ones. 

My intention is not to reactivate my German License in Germany, but I want to get able to fly in the USA with a valid US license because I am living in Florida permanently. 

The question now I wanted to ask is:

 can I use my - at the moment - not active German license in combination with my US FAA license from 1981 with a new valid US medical and the necessary test flights to get a valid FAA license/certificate? 

Votes
1516 Posts

@Michael Meile
No.

To fly on an FAA certificate based on a foreign pilot certificate you must have a current medical which can be from either that country or the FAA, which you could do.  But you also need a letter from that country's aviation authority.  14 CFR 61.75.  I'm guessing you don't have and (because your German license isn't current) can't get that letter. 

Absent the German papers, all you could do is apply for a new FAA pilot certificate based on completion of the required written and practical tests.  You can use your existing flight time in your pilot logbook to meet the aeronautical experience requirements but you'll need some flight and ground training to prepare for the necessary tests.  Talk to a local flight school about what that would entail.

In addition, since you're only a permanent US resident, not a US citizen, you'll also have to go through the Flight Training Security Program (FSTP) before starting the flight training: