Logging SIC in a Citation CJ3
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A company owns a CJ3 and is hiring a pilot to fly Second in Command (SIC) in it because their insurance is requiring it to get the coverage they need. The pilot who will fly it PIC is qualified to fly it single pilot.
My question is can the pilot hired to fly it SIC log the time he is flying acting as SIC?
61.51 says you can log SIC in an aircraft that requires more than one pilot by the aircraft's type certificate.
The CJ3 type certificate says the minimum crew is one pilot OR two pilots.

AOPA has a CJ3. Do you operate it with two pilots?
 
2 Replies
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Hello Robert!
Right seaters on certified single-pilot turbine equipment can only make an informational logging entry; the second pilot cannot count the hours in book totals. Both AOPA & NBAA recommend tracking this kind of time as a separate entry for the value of the experience that, indeed, can be recognized by a future employer. But again, it's not time that can be lumped with your current PIC logging. No, it is not official SIC time. Yes, we do often have a 'safety second' pilot in our right seat; they can make themselves a nice 'remarks section' entry.
Votes
G. Martz:
Right seaters on certified single-pilot turbine equipment can only make an informational logging entry; the second pilot cannot count the hours in book totals.

...if the PIC is single-pilot qualified. If the aircraft is SP-qualified but the PIC is not, then a 61.55-qualified SIC is required, and that properly qualified second pilot can log it as SIC time (although in that case, the second pilot must be fully qualified per 61.55 except while undergoing that 61.55 SIC training IAW 61.55(h)). Only if the aircraft and PIC are both SP-qualified is a SIC not required and thus a second pilot is unable to log the time. Of course, if the SP-PIC in an SP aircraft goes under the hood, then the 91.109-reqiured safety pilot can log it as SIC time because now a second pilot is required, but I don't think that's what we're talking about here.
 
G. Martz:
Both AOPA & NBAA recommend tracking this kind of time as a separate entry for the value of the experience that, indeed, can be recognized by a future employer. But again, it's not time that can be lumped with your current PIC logging. No, it is not official SIC time. Yes, we do often have a 'safety second' pilot in our right seat; they can make themselves a nice 'remarks section' entry.

Making extraneous entries in a legal document like a 61.51 pilot logbook is contrary to the recommendations of every attorney (aviation or otherwise) with whom I've spoken. It can create serious problems for whoever made the entry if that document ever shows up in a court of law. Airline hiring personnel also have serious heartburn about 61.51 pilot logbook entries for time that doesn't meet 61.51 or other FAA standards. My legal eagle friends tell me such things are better recorded in a separate journal. Choose wisely.