VFR cruise altitude
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I am a student pilot and have a question about cruising altitudes. While selecting the VFR cruising altitude (odd thousand+500ft or even thousand+500ft), should we just look at the overall magnetic course between the origin and destination airports or consider each individual segment? If the overall magnetic course is easterly, but a segment is westerly, do we need to fly that segment alone at even thousand+500ft
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Thanks, Rodney. 
The response to this question in the July 3,2020, AOPA ePilot incorrectly interchanges course and heading: It reads, "According to FAR 91.159, you should cruise at an altitude consistent with your current course. So, if your first leg is on a westerly heading, and the second leg is on an easterly heading, and you're cruising above 3,000 feet agl for both, you should use even thousands plus 500 feet for the first leg, and odd thousands plus 500 feet for the second."

The FAR is based on magnetic course, not heading. When flying on a northerly or southerly course, I remind myself of the reason it is based on course with this example: Consider you are flying a magnetic course of 360 and another aircraft is approaching you from the north at a similar altitude on a course of 180, both more than 3,000 ft AGL. A strong westerly wind would cause you both to crab with a westerly heading to stay on course. If you both select your altitude according to your heading, you will be flying at an even thousand plus 500 ft MSL, potentially placing you on a collision course. 
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Thanks, Ronald
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By the regulation for VFR (91.159, which says "on a course", i.e., which way you are currently going), you should cruise at an altitude consistent with your current course.  So, if your first leg is 330, and the second leg is 020, and you're cruising above 3000 AGL, you should use even+500 for the first leg, and odd+500 for the second.  Keep in mind that the issue here is to help VFR traffic see each other, and the other traffic doesn't know your overall plan, only which way you're going right now.