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Have a PPL SEL. Considering a new Lighter Than Air (LTA) rating. Do I need a new student pilot certificate or does the PPL satisfy the requirements?
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Have a PPL SEL.  Considering a new Lighter Than Air (LTA) rating.  Do I need a new student pilot certificate or does the PPL satisfy the requirements?

Note:  Similar question likely to apply to any new rating.
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Stephen Luce:
Have a PPL SEL.  Considering a new Lighter Than Air (LTA) rating.  Do I need a new student pilot certificate or does the PPL satisfy the requirements?
No, you do not need a new Student Pilot certificate. During your Additional Category Rating training you'll be flying on the strength of your existing PPL ticket under the provisions of 61.31(d)(2):

(d) Aircraft category, class, and type ratings: Limitations on operating an aircraft as the pilot in command. To serve as the pilot in command of an aircraft, a person must—

(1) Hold the appropriate category, class, and type rating (if a class or type rating is required) for the aircraft to be flown; or

(2) Have received training required by this part that is appropriate to the pilot certification level, aircraft category, class, and type rating (if a class or type rating is required) for the aircraft to be flown, and have received an endorsement for solo flight in that aircraft from an authorized instructor.
Stephen Luce:
Note:  Similar question likely to apply to any new rating.

Not just likely -- it does.
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This is a good question and one that AOPA's Pilot Information Center receives on a regular basis. Believe it or not, most call to state their flight instructor has asked them to obtain a student pilot certificate so that they may solo. That is absolutely incorrect! With the exception of a US certificate issued on the basis of a foreign, a pilot can only hold one grade of pilot certificate. In other words, you cannot hold both a private and student pilot certificate concurrently. 

If you hold a private certificate with SEL rating, your solo privilege in a new category and class will be in the form of an endorsement in your pilot logbook, which you will then carry with you on each flight to show your legal authority to fly as PIC. The little known gem that allows for this is endorsement number A.72 on page A-19 in this advisory circular - https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Advisory_Circular/AC_61-65H.pdf

There are similarities to a student pilot endorsement in that you may only fly solo - no passengers allowed with you. The instructor can also add stipulations and restrictions, at his or her option.

While you can only hold one grade of pilot certificate, privileges in other grades and category and classes can be added to that pilot certificate. For example, an airline captain wants to add a helicopter rating to his credentials, but just to fly for fun. He can hold an ATP with MEL privileges, yet have commercial privileges in SEL, and private privileges in rotorcraft-helicopter. All of those are so noted on the single pilot certificate he carries.