Passed exam
Hi everyone,
I am happy to say that I took and prevailed to pass the REMOTE PILOT test on Saturday, 23 Feb 2019.

I encourage everyone to study hard because they often ask for the "best answer" even though none of the three sound like the "right answer."

Have all of you taken your test yet?  Are you just on this channel to learn more about REMOTE PILOTING before you take the test or have you already become a Remote Pilot?

Whoever is in charge of this channel, please call it "small Unmanned Aerial Systems" instead of "drones" as those are military aircraft and spacecraft that are not limited to the requirements of FAR Part 107.  Everyone needs to use the proper terminology because there is a vast difference between the abused terminology of "drone" and the toys that countless people use for their kids whether they are legally operated under FAR Part 107 or the exemption for hobbies.  Most Americas do not and will never own a "drone."  Just because the media abuses that term each day, the AOPA and these discussion groups should have everyone understanding the difference.

bye
Brennan
Louisville, KY
Aerial Videographer / Cinematographer / Aeronautical Scientist
6 Replies
congrats on passing the exam! Whats next for you, where can you go from there? I would like to better understand.

thanks

Brennan Callan:

Whoever is in charge of this channel, please call it "small Unmanned Aerial Systems" instead of "drones" as those are military aircraft and spacecraft that are not limited to the requirements of FAR Part 107.  Everyone needs to use the proper terminology because there is a vast difference between the abused terminology of "drone" and the toys that countless people use for their kids whether they are legally operated under FAR Part 107 or the exemption for hobbies.  Most Americas do not and will never own a "drone."  Just because the media abuses that term each day, the AOPA and these discussion groups should have everyone understanding the difference.


Sorry, but "drone" is used commonly by the FAA in reference to all manner of unmanned aircraft operations, however the term is not defined in any FAA order or FARs relating to unmanned aircraft that I can find.  If you want to split hairs, "Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems" is the proper terminology for unmanned aircraft weighing less than 55lbs according to AC-107, and the Air Force refers to unmanned aircraft such as the MQ-9 Reaper and RQ-4 Global Hawk as "Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA)" and their pilots as "Remotely Piloted Aircraft Pilots"

Congrats on passing the remote pilot aeronautical knowledge test, but I think you've shown this doesn't make you an expert on the topic, but rather offers a license to continue learning as with any other pilot certificate.
In any industry, there are people who are sloppy and they use slang as their formal method of communication.  It does not make it right.  The term "drone" is MILITARY and should never be applied to civilian toys and when we hear the media bastardize the term, it is because they want to sound as if they know what they are talking about.

The fact is that the FAA continues to evolve their FARs extremely frequently.  A new one starts today that the Tail Number must be displayed on the exterior of the small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS).

For centuries, "ain't" was just used by the uneducated people.  It was still considered grammatically incorrect and only uttered by the lesser educated.  The abuse of the word "drone" has been similar.  Folks might believe it easier or simpler to say than small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS), but it immediately illustrates someone that does not know what they are talking about.

If you see someone claiming to be a civilian "drone instructor," don't dare give them a dime to learn from them.  You already learned they do not know what they are talking about just with the utterance of that improper term.

In aviation we easily have 1,000+ abbreviations, so we cannot afford to have the media and others using improper slang to dictate the profession.

Best wishes,
Brennan
Aeronautical Scientist
Hi Jorge, et al.,
I have done aerial filmography starting in 1981 and aerial videography after that.  Next it will be to use a "small Unmanned Aerial System" (sUAS).  In a couple of weeks my mom will take her Remote Pilot exam too.  Since 2005, I have run a cinematography club networking filmmakers and entertainers in 100+ nations.  Therefore, I have some good networking I have done over those years.

Best wishes,
Brennan

Brennan Callan:

The term "drone" is MILITARY and should never be applied to civilian toys and when we hear the media bastardize the term, it is because they want to sound as if they know what they are talking about.

The fact is that the FAA continues to evolve their FARs extremely frequently.  A new one starts today that the Tail Number must be displayed on the exterior of the small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS).

For centuries, "ain't" was just used by the uneducated people.  It was still considered grammatically incorrect and only uttered by the lesser educated.  The abuse of the word "drone" has been similar.  Folks might believe it easier or simpler to say than small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS), but it immediately illustrates someone that does not know what they are talking about.

Best wishes,
Brennan
Aeronautical Scientist


Ok, Mr. "Aeronautical Scientist", let's try this again...

The term "drone" does NOT refer specifically to military unmanned aircraft.  In fact, the term appears nowhere in the The DOD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, which sets forth standard US military and associated terminology to encompass the joint activity of the Armed Forces of the United States.  

You will find the term Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) in the DOD Dictionary and FAA AC-107-2, NOT Unmanned Aerial System which you keep insisting is the proper terminology based on a reference you have yet to offer.  You might find that adding authoritative references to your post can lend credibility to your arguments, rather than the opposite effect that you so capably identify in your own words..."immediately illustrates someone that does not know what they are talking about."
Congrats on passing the exam and becoming a certificated remote pilot! 

As for the term "drone", we (AOPA) utilized it when we launched the drone membership in 2017, as it was somewhat universally known as an unmanned system. We further defined our membership class via articles, description, benefits, discounts as being geared toward the remote pilot community. We don't need to argue over what to call it, I still get a giggled as a FAA Part 61 commercial pilot myself, when people refer to it as a "manned" airplane. Wait! I am a female pilot! haha. 

As long as we explain our terms and our audience, I don't think we have to make mountains out of mole hills. 

AOPA's mission was to welcome the drone community....aka the remote pilot community, but also consider others that want to fly (hobbyists) etc. as those are such important touch points into aviation. I, myself learned to build models and fly r/c as a child, before I became a Part 61 pilot and now a remote pilot. We need to focus on our goals, our passions, and inspire those around us to take up whatever form of aviation inspires them! 

Again, all my best on passing your exam and continued success.

Blue Skies,

Kat Swain
Sr. Director of UAS
AOPA