User Badges

AOPA Pilot Information Center Staff
Facilitator
Inquirer
Inquirer
View Badge Glossary
Update My Subscriptions

Friends

0 Friends No Data Available

My Items

There are no Items to display.

My Upcoming Events

No Data Available

My Bookmarks

    No saved bookmarks. Click on the Bookmark link throughout the community to add bookmarks

My Newsfeed

When buying and aircraft it is highly recommended to get a “Title Search” to see if there are any liens or encumbrances on the aircraft before you purchase it.  This often brings up the question for new and old buyers alike.  “Does an aircraft have a Title?” and the answer is no aircraft do not have Titles, ownership is established by the registration, which is why the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch is so picky when processing new registration applications making sure ...

Daddis At AOPA posted new forum topic
2d

An interesting topic came up this week regarding the above question. The seating was as such in a Skyhawk: a private pilot training for an instrument rating occupying the left front seat; a commercial pilot acting as safety pilot and PIC for the flight occupying the right front seat; and an instrument instructor providing instruction from a back seat. Assume all pilots are current, legal, and otherwise qualified.

In our never ending quest to add PIC time in our logbooks, ...

A student pilot told me that when he measured out his planned long solo cross-country flight he needs to earn his Private certificate, the distance came to 148 (or so) miles. He really wanted to make this flight. “Isn’t that close enough to satisfy the FAA requirement?” he asked.

Unfortunately, no, it is not. The regulation in question, 61.109(a)(5)(ii), states it must be 150 nautical miles total distance with landings at three points. 148 (or so) miles is close, but will ...

Daddis At AOPA posted new forum topic
4d

A student pilot told me that when he measured out his planned long solo cross-country flight he needs to earn his Private certificate, the distance came to 148 (or so) miles. He really wanted to make this flight. “Isn’t that close enough to satisfy the FAA requirement?” he asked.

Unfortunately, no, it is not. The regulation in question, 61.109(a)(5)(ii), states it must be 150 nautical miles total distance with landings at three points. 148 (or so) miles is close, but will ...

Daddis At AOPA posted new forum topic
11d

Very simply, the answer is a definite No!

One day, during my full time instructor stint in the 1980's, I saw our trusty Cessna buck-and-a-half pull up to the ramp after landing, shut down, and I watched two of our student pilots get out. Jovial, smiling, laughing…then the mean old instructor walks up. “What are you two doing?” I asked.

“Just practicing together” was the reply. I informed them that in no way, no how, and at no time are two student pilots permitted to fly ...

Daddis At AOPA posted new forum topic
18d

A student pilot certificate is required to solo, and a glider or balloon student can solo at the age of 14. To that end, a student pilot certificate application can be started for any person who is at least 13 years of age. However, a person must be within 90 days of their 14th birthday in order to complete an application, and apply for a student pilot certificate on FAA's IACRA web site, here:

Remember that a student pilot certificate can be used to solo any aircraft the person ...

Daddis At AOPA posted new forum topic
25d

No, it does not. Student pilot certificates are issued without any ratings. It’s all about the logbook endorsements as a student pilot certificate affords, effectively, no privileges without them.

The ability to solo, fly cross country, fly a specific aircraft, and fly in certain airspace, among others, is accomplished by receiving the required training and then a corresponding logbook endorsement. Student pilots then carry that logbook on each flight to show ...

For me, it was DCA - Washington National. Back in the day (early 1990's), all you needed was a class B (or TCA) clearance to enter VFR. The same for departing.

On one particularly nice, but breezy spring day with the winds out of the east, I was cleared for takeoff on runway 3, maintain runway heading on climb out, until clear of P-56, then on course. On most days with a normal west wind, that clearance would take you just east of P-56. On this day, however, it was clear I would ...

Daddis At AOPA posted new forum topic
Aug '21

Just this past Monday, August 9th, Canada has implemented a process for fully vaccinated US citizens to enter the country for non-essential travel. In addition to all the basic international travel requirements, their Covid-19 specifics have been released and are posted on AOPA's Canada travel web page here - aopa.org/travel/international-travel/canada

Proof of vaccination for each traveler must be uploaded in their 13-step ArriveCan web portal, available at ...

Daddis At AOPA posted new forum topic
Aug '21

For me, it was DCA - Washington National. Back in the day (early 1990's), all you needed was a class B (or TCA) clearance to enter VFR. The same for departing.

On one particularly nice, but breezy spring day with the winds out of the east, I was cleared for takeoff on runway 3, maintain runway heading on climb out, until clear of P-56, then on course. On most days with a normal west wind, that clearance would take you just east of P-56. On this day, however, it was clear I would ...